The Bode's Galaxy and The Cigar galaxy
Equipment :
Mount:
SkyWatcher EQ-6R Pro GoTo
Telescope:
Skywatcher Esprit 100/550 with SW flattener
Camera:
ZWO ASI071 MC Pro
Guiding telescope:
Skywatcher ED50 APO
Guiding Camera:
ZWO ASI290 MM Mini
Controller:
ZWO ASIAIR
Image Details
Objects
Bode's Galaxy, Cigar Galaxy,M 81, M 82, NGC 3031, NGC 3034, NGC 3077,
https://www.astrobin.com/full/8k7m0l/0/
Exp. data :
50 x 120s, 113 x 300s, 14 x 600s
Image capture date  :
March - Mai 2020
Observing Site
Nagybörzsöny - Hungary
E18°49'29" ; N47°55'57"
Short Description
(from wikipedia - the free encyclopedia)
The M81 Group is a galaxy group in the constellations Ursa Major and Camelopardalis that includes the galaxies Messier 81 and Messier 82, as well as several other galaxies with high apparent brightnesses.[1] The approximate center of the group is located at a distance of 3.6 Mpc, making it one of the nearest groups to the Local Group.[1] The group is estimated to have a total mass of (1.03 ± 0.17)×1012M☉.[2] The M81 Group, the Local Group, and other nearby groups all lie within the Virgo Supercluster (i.e. the Local Supercluster).

Messier 81 (also known as NGC 3031 or Bode's Galaxy) is a grand design spiral galaxy about 12 million light-years away, with a diameter of 90,000 light years, about half the size of the Milky Way, in the constellation Ursa Major. Due to its proximity to Earth, large size, and active galactic nucleus (which harbors a 70 million M☉[5] supermassive black hole), Messier 81 has been studied extensively by professional astronomers. The galaxy's large size and relatively high brightness also makes it a popular target for amateur astronomers.

Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy or M82) is a starburst galaxy approximately 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. A member of the M81 Group, it is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and has a center one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy's center.[7] The starburst activity is thought to have been triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81. As the closest starburst galaxy to Earth, M82 is the prototypical example of this galaxy type.[7] SN 2014J, a type Ia supernova, was discovered in the galaxy on 21 January 2014.[8][9][10] In 2014, in studying M82, scientists discovered the brightest pulsar yet known, designated M82 X-2